Dehai News

How opinion polls can help end wars

Posted by: The Conversation Global highlights

Date: Friday, 23 February 2024

Plus: Beyoncé’s foray into country music ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌

Amid the death and suffering of Israel’s war in Gaza and the Hamas attack on Israel on October 7 it followed, prospects for lasting peace between Israelis and Palestinians appear ever more elusive. But when the fighting eventually ends, pressure will mount for negotiations to begin for a deal. When that day comes, how can opposing sides in such an intractable conflict find enough common ground to reach an agreement?

In this episode of The Conversation Weekly podcast, we hear about a method called peace polling, tried out successfully in Northern Ireland, that could offer a blueprint for how to reach a settlement in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Gemma Ware

Editor and host, The Conversation Weekly, London

Hands Across the Divide: a statue in Derry, Northern Ireland. Imago / Alamy Stock Photo

Israel-Gaza: how opinion polls used in Northern Ireland could pave a way to peace

Gemma Ware, The Conversation

In The Conversation Weekly podcast, researcher Colin Irwin explains how peace polls can help build consensus in conflict negotiations – but only if all parties are at the table.

Beyoncé and her husband, Jay-Z, at the 66th Grammy Awards on Feb. 4, 2024, in Los Angeles. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

With Beyoncé’s foray into country music, the genre may finally break free from the stereotypes that have long dogged it

William Nash, Middlebury

Her new songs are arriving at a moment when country music’s reputation as overwhelmingly white is finally starting to crack.

New York City could be described as a news oasis – the city’s density and wealth mean there are many news outlets competing. Gary Hershorn/via Getty Images

Wealthier, urban Americans have access to more local news – while roughly half of US counties have only one outlet or less

Sarah Stonbely, Northwestern University

The number of nonprofit news outlets is holding steady as they go out of business just as fast as they are founded.

 
 
 
 

EmbassyMedia - ራብዓይ ግንባር!

Dehai Events